With the exception of picking out a cute pattern or style, there was never anything exciting about underwear shopping. Today, that’s beginning to change with the rise of the conscious consumer looking for more than just a pair of panties to cover their nether regions. Now, avoiding things like period leaks and bacterial infections factor into what kind of underwear women are buying, as well as the fabrics they’re made of (#sustainability).

If owning a selection of panties that are good for your body and the planet is important to you, here’s three innovative Canadian companies you should know about.

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Go ahead, do your 🍑 a favor. #knix

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1. Knix: The Period-Proof Underwear

The future of periods is here, and it’s less messy. Gone are the days of awkward pads and embarrassing leaks. Knix underwear are changing the way we manage our periods, and now they’re even more accessible with the opening of their first brick-and-mortar stores in Toronto and Vancouver.

Made for a wide variety of body shapes and sizes, their seamless, sweat-wicking, odor-combating, leak-proof underwear absorb the equivalent of two regular tampons (or about 2-3 teaspoons of moisture). Absorbent technology in the gusset (that’s the fabric panel that goes between your legs) allows Knix underwear to absorb extra blood without bulking in appearance. You’ll barely even notice them and they’re machine washable.

Knix has also launched a line of ‘Oh-No’ Proof Underwear for teens – something we wish we had in our early high school days. Beyond the usual boyshort and bikini styles, they offer a ‘Sleepover Short’ with extra length in the front and back to ensure your sheets stay period stain-free.

2. Huha: The Health-Conscious Underwear

You’ve never seen a pair of undies like this before. Vancouver start-up Huha‘s groundbreaking anti-bacterial underwear are designed with the health of your vagina in mind. According to Huha, synthetic fabrics don’t allow air to pass through fibres, causing sweat and moisture to become trapped. This creates a breeding ground for bad bacteria and can result in not-so-lovely yeast and urinary tract infections.

That’s why Huha‘s ditched synthetics in favour of fabrics that are more breathable and prevent the growth of bad bacteria strains. Their underwear are made from natural fibres and are free of hundreds of harmful chemicals commonly found in undergarments. Infused with pharmaceutical grade zinc, Huha’s undies promote a healthy vaginal pH while keeping odour and infection-causing bacteria away.

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You are enough, just as you are, as you exist, perfectly imperfect. Give yourself some extra love today, you deserve it 💛⁠ ⁠ Featured is our Gold Elza Bralette + High-Waist undies, both of which are #madeincanada in lovely Montreal! ⁠ ⁠ ⁠ #ethicallingerie #azurabay⁠ ⁠ Muse on the right @shayna.hogan⁠ 📸 @camryn.elizabeth.photo⁠ ⁠ ⁠ #youareenough #youarebeautiful #youaremagic #selflovery #selflovejourney #selflovematters #selfloveclub #selflovesunday #loveyourself💜 #loveyourselfie #ethicalstyle #sustainablestyle #bodysuits #ecofashion #slowsunday #selfcaresunday⁠ ⁠#ethicalfashion #fairfashion #womensupportingwomen #womensupportingotherwomen #werisebyliftingeachother #werisebyliftingothers #grlpwr #girlpower💪 #fiercefemales #femalesarestrongashell #goldaesthetic ⁠ ⁠

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3. Azura Bay: The Sustainable Underwear

Looking for sustainable and ethical underwear options that have both the planet’s health in mind and your own? Azura Bay is a Winnipeg-based company that has taken it upon themselves to curate a collection of the best conscious lingerie brands that use eco-friendly fabrics and production processes as much as possible. You’ll find Sokoloff Lingerie (designed and produced in Quebec), Vitamin A (which uses recycled nylon fibres), and Underprotection (produced in fair trade facilities using sustainable fabrics) on their website. Even their packaging has the environment in mind – Azura Bay uses 100 per cent recycled boxes and tissue paper.

Britta Bisig

Britta Bisig

Britta is the Editor-in-Chief of VancouverVogue.com and the Vancouver Correspondent for Style.ca. She's a lover of fashion, thrifting and beauty, and enjoys sharing her affordable style inspiration and tips to help others look fabulous without breaking the bank. Britta is also a luxury and lifestyle brand PR specialist with White Rabbit Communications.

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